Author: John Green

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Review: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

March 3, 2012 Review 3 ★★★★★

Review: The Fault in Our Stars by John GreenRelease Date: January 10, 2012
Title: The Fault in Our Stars
Author: John Green
Pages: 218
Publisher: Dutton Books
Source: Owned
From the Publisher: Diagnosed with Stage IV thyroid cancer at 12, Hazel was prepared to die until, at 14, a medical miracle shrunk the tumours in her lungs... for now.

Two years post-miracle, sixteen-year-old Hazel is post-everything else, too; post-high school, post-friends and post-normalcy. And even though she could live for a long time (whatever that means), Hazel lives tethered to an oxygen tank, the tumours tenuously kept at bay with a constant chemical assault.

Enter Augustus Waters. A match made at cancer kid support group, Augustus is gorgeous, in remission, and shockingly to her, interested in Hazel. Being with Augustus is both an unexpected destination and a long-needed journey, pushing Hazel to re-examine how sickness and health, life and death, will define her and the legacy that everyone leaves behind.
5 Stars

I really don’t have the words to express how much I loved this book. On the surface, it’s an ill-fated love story. But that hardly scratches the surface. This book is about life and living life to the fullest while facing the inevitability of mortality and oblivion.

I fell in love with Augustus Waters on the very first page he appeared.

John Green is one hell of a writer. Not only did he capture a teenage girl’s voice perfectly,┬áhe also has that uncanny ability to make me laugh and cry at the same time. It’s not easy to simultaneously break one’s heart and offer healing, but John Green can do that. And he did it so very well.

To be honest, I put off reading this book for nearly two months because I was afraid of reading some Debbie Downer book that I couldn’t handle at the current point of my life. I heard “cancer” and immediately thought of Lurlene McDaniels and how I used to read her books and bawl until I couldn’t see anymore.

This is not the same sort of story.

There is cancer, yes. There is also reality. But there is also love. And there is life.

It’s really the best kind of book.

It will definitely get a reread.

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