Author: Megan Crewe

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Review: The Way We Fall by Megan Crewe

January 16, 2012 Review 4 ★★★★

Review: The Way We Fall by Megan CreweRelease Date: January 24, 2012
Title: The Way We Fall
Series: Fallen World #1
Author: Megan Crewe
Pages: 304
Publisher: Disney Hyperion Books for Children
From the Publisher: When a deadly virus begins to sweep through sixteen-year-old Kaelyn's community, the government quarantines her island-no one can leave, and no one can come back.

Those still healthy must fight for dwindling supplies, or lose all chance of survival. As everything familiar comes crashing down, Kaelyn joins forces with a former rival and discovers a new love in the midst of heartbreak. When the virus starts to rob her of friends and family, she clings to the belief that there must be a way to save the people she holds dearest.

Because how will she go on if there isn't?

Megan Crewe crafts a powerful and gripping exploration of self-preservation, first love, and hope.  Poignant and dizzying, this heart-wrenching story of one girl's bravery and unbeatable spirit will leave readers fervently awaiting the next book in this standout new series.
4 Stars

It’s so weird that I just watched the movie Contagion last weekend. It was a good movie, but I found it lacking in some ways. This book had all of the things I’d wished were in that movie. Not that they’re the same – but both are about a virus epidemic that kills most of its victims.

I’m really glad there’s a sequel in the works for this novel, otherwise my rating would have gone way down for the way the ending just leaves you hanging. It ends with hope, but nothing concrete. And with a book like this, you need something concrete when it’s over or else you end up just floundering about.

Crewe really did a fabulous job taking the story of an epidemic and presenting it in the YA format. Seeing and feeling these events from the perspective of a teenager is something that doesn’t often happen, and she pulled it off flawlessly. Some of the most well written scenes were those told from the perspective of someone infected with the virus. I also liked how most of the book (or all? in some places it was a wee bit hard to tell) was written as a journal from Kaelyn to her ex-best friend Leo. It felt more personal to me that way, and I found myself identifying more with Kaelyn and what she was going through.

Overall, Crewe showed the depth of fragility and strength contained within humankind.

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